Affirming Behavioral Health Care

Behavioral Health provides accepting and affirmative counseling services for the LGBTQIA+ and allied community in Texas.

PROGRAMS & SERVICES

  • Telehealth & In-Person Counseling
  • Individual Counseling
    • Adults (18+) and Youth (13-17)
  • Couples & Relationship Counseling
  • Counseling Internship Program for Master’s-Level students
  • Intensive Out Patient (IOP) Treatment

INSURANCE ACCEPTED & SELF-PAY RATES AVAILABLE

 

Please note: Resource Center Mental Health does not offer crisis assessments or crisis-related services. For all mental-health emergencies, call 988 immediately, or please safely get to the nearest emergency room.

(IOP) Intensive Out Patient Treatment

The Resource Center Intensive Outpatient Program (IOP) is designed for mental health or substance abuse challenges commonly experienced by LGBTQ+ people.

Our IOP consists of educational and process counseling sessions held for three hours, three days per week in a comfortable and safe group space.  Through evidence-based approaches our licensed clinical staff provide support and structure that helps you create changes in thoughts, feelings, and behaviors.  In IOP you will learn problem-solving skills that address specific areas of care to reinforce strategies for improving your overall wellbeing.

Areas of Care and Topics

  • Living with Anxiety
  • Stigma-Based Stress & Social Alienation
  • Sexual Identity
  • Sex, Love, and Intimacy
  • Improving Motivation and Productivity
  • Managing Depression
  • Gender Identity and Authentic Living
  • Sexual Health Awareness and Education
  • Confidence, Respect and Self-Compassion
  • Alcohol and Other Substance Use
  • Progress to Healthy Recovery
  • Career and Workplace Satisfaction
  • Understanding Trauma and Internalized Shame
  • Understanding Grief and Loss
  • Improving Relationships with Family and Friends

 

IOP Meets In-Person:

Mondays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays
10:00 AM to 1:00 PM

5750 Cedar Springs Road
Dallas, TX  75220

Phone:
214-393-3640

Email:
counseling@myresourcecenter.org

Paying for Our Healthcare Services

Health Insurance

We accept most major insurance plans.

Self-Pay Rates Available

Contact us for rates.

HSA/FSA Cards

We accept credit cards, debit cards , and we provide our rates before you begin treatment.

Meet our licensed therapists

Julie Sorrels (she/they)

Julie Sorrels, MS, NCC, LPC, LMFT
Behavioral Health Program Manager

Q: How long have you been working in the behavioral health field?

A:
I have been working in behavioral health for almost four years as a therapist focused on gender, sexuality, and relationships. I am certified by the American Board of Sexology as a Clinical Sexologist and I’m currently pursuing sex therapy certification with Sexual Health Alliance. This is my second career after working in marketing for over 15 years. Through my own experiences with sexuality, gender, and relationships, I became passionate about providing LGBTQIA+ affirmative therapy. In addition to seeing patients, I supervise our master’s-level counseling interns, and provide clinical oversight for behavioral health operations and program activities at Resource Center.

Q: What do you think is needed to help improve the mental health of LGBTQIA+ individuals?

A: LGBTQIA+ individuals are at increased risk of experiencing discrimination, stigma, family rejection, and marginalization. While our community is incredibly resilient, these challenges negatively impact mental health, with the biggest impact on BIPOC and those with intersecting marginalized identities. The rise of anti-LGBTQ+ and racist rhetoric and legislation weigh heavily on our community. We see that impact every day in the therapy room with patients. To improve mental health of LGBTQIA+ individuals, it is so important to decrease discrimination and stigma by advocating for legal protections, community inclusion, representation, and affordable affirmative therapy.

Q: What motivates you to continue the work that you do?

A: My patients inspire me and motivate me. I have seen how powerful it can be to have a nonjudgmental space to process the impact of culture and come to better understand ourselves. My patients show vulnerability and strength in showing up for themselves in this process, which motivates me to show up for them. It is a huge honor to sit with patients through highs, lows, and in-betweens and look for meaning in all of it.

Marvin Washington (he/him)

Marvin Washington, LPC

Q: How long have you been working in the behavioral health field?

A: I have been working as a mental health therapist since January 2021. I began at Resource Center Behavioral Health as a master’s level intern while enrolled in the counseling program at SMU. Following SMU, I remained at Resource Center first as a contract therapist before beginning my current full-time behavioral health therapist position in October 2022 as an LPC Associate. Now I’m a full-time LPC.

Q: What do you think is needed to help improve the mental health of LGBTQIA+ individuals?

A: I believe increasing the number of multiculturally competent and affirming therapists of diverse cultures, races, affectional orientations, and genders continues to be a need in the mental health field to greater assist LGBTQIA+ individuals in improving mental well-being. There is so much value in providing a safe space where people are genuinely accepted so they can be truly authentic and vulnerable about their lived experiences, thoughts, feelings, emotions, desires, and goals.

Q: What motivates you to continue the work that you do?

A: I have a passion that has led to a purpose. Today, only about 1% of mental health clinicians are Black men. As the demand for mental health services continues to increase, I understand that I am in a unique position to work with individuals of underrepresented groups as they seek to gain greater understanding and create positive change in their lives, and it is the realization of this need that remains a primary motivator for me to continue the work that I do.

Eli Cadena-Bowles (they/he)

Elisha “Eli” Cadena-Bowles, LPC

Q: How long have you been working in the behavioral health field?

A: I’ve been working in the Behavioral Health field for a little over two years now; first as an intern at Resource Center, then as a contract therapist, and now a full-time LPC.  Prior to starting work at Resource Center in January of 2021, my first sessions with clients began during 2020 as part of the clinical sequence of SMU’s Counseling program.

Q: What do you think is needed to help improve the mental health of LGBTQIA+ individuals?

A: A fundamental factor in improving the mental health of LGBTQ+ individuals must start within the field of mental health itself, specifically integrating contemporary, multicultural approaches to be sensitive of diverse and varying lived experiences. Being in a space where you don’t code-switch or feel “othered” can be life-changing, especially for those with have to mask, c intersecting identities. And I feel that being immersed in community + community care is vital to improving the overall health and well-being of our individual and collective experiences.

Q: What motivates you to continue the work that you do?

A: Getting to facilitate a space of slowness, kindness, and curiosity for people to catch a break from the grind of life and practice self-inquiry is a truly magical experience and privilege; this sentiment feels even stronger when cultivating therapeutic space alongside Black, Indigenous, queer, and trans folks. Integrating deep rest + restorative practices, ancestral work, and somatic work with communities that have historically been exploited continues to motivate me tremendously because fostering even the tiniest bit of hope for many of us is a radical and empowering act in and of itself.

Leigh Shamburger-Adams (she/her)

Leigh Shamburger-Adams, LPC

Q: How long have you been working in the behavioral health field?

A: I began working at Resource Center as an intern while getting my Masters in Counseling from SMU in 2020, then continued after becoming a Licensed Professional Counselor Associate.

Q: What do you think is needed to help improve the mental health of LGBTQIA+ individuals?

A: At the societal level, securing equal rights and eliminating dehumanizing political rhetoric would do a lot to lessen pervasive anxiety and fear in LGBTQIA+ individuals, families, and the community. Feeling safe, secure, and valued are the bedrock of mental health. At the personal level, working with an affirming therapist can be an exciting and freeing journey of self-discovery. Better self-understanding counters shame. It allows us to understand self-destructive behaviors and thinking that no longer serve us and paves the way for more productive, more relational behaviors and thinking.

Q: What motivates you to continue the work that you do?

A: My patients inspire me every day with their ability to come into session, roll up their sleeves, and open their curiosity to what is happening in their lives. Observing patients improve their relationships, lessen anxiety and depression, and gain confidence is extremely rewarding.

Claire Howard (she/her)

Claire Howard, MM, LMFT Associate
SUPERVISED BY HEATHER AUSTIN-ROBILLARD, LMFT-S

Q: How long have you been working in the behavioral health field?

A: I’ve been working in behavioral health since December of 2020, but have only had my LMFT-Associate license since September 2022. My first sessions as a therapist were at the height of the pandemic via Zoom, and I am so grateful that I can see clients virtually and in person now!

Q: What do you think is needed to help improve the mental health of LGBTQIA+ individuals?

A: Loneliness is so rampant in our post-pandemic world. I think that the safety of community is vital to improving mental health outcomes for LGBTQIA+ individuals.  Community can be accessed in so many forms: honest conversation and laughter with a friend, attending a support group, or connecting with a therapist. I believe that we cannot heal in isolation.

Additionally, I’d be remiss if I didn’t acknowledge the difficulty of improving mental health in a community that is so frequently legislated against, so often the victim of hate speech and hate crimes. To truly impact mental health outcomes for LGBTQIA+ individuals in the state of Texas, we must advocate for legislation that protects us. It is impossible to truly feel safe and connected when your rights are up for public debate.

Q: What motivates you to continue the work that you do?

A: Being a therapist is sacred. I believe that my job is to walk alongside my clients, remind them of their value, and hold hope for them until they’re ready to carry it. I am constantly motivated to continue my work in this field when I witness the resilience, bravery, and continued evolution of my clients. I am so grateful to them for the authentic and vulnerable way that they show up in the world, which inspires me to do the same.

Sara Sanchez (they/them)

Sara Sanchez, LMFT Associate
Supervised by Kayli Cross, LMFT-S.

Q: How long have you been working in the Behavioral Health Field? 

A: I have been working in behavioral health since September 2021. Before Resource Center, I worked in both private practice and an intensive outpatient facility for youth mental health and substance use. Resource Center does a fantastic job of providing multiple systems of support, which I believe is transformative.

Q: What do you think is needed to help improve the mental health of LGBTQIA+ individuals?

A: Creating spaces of safety and community goes so much further than the therapy room. Mental health directly connects to social and systemic support. For me, a big part of the work is helping find those points of connection. There is no amount of individual therapy that can make up for a world that feels unsafe to live in. I think the field of therapy has historically been one that focuses on pathology. Creating space that instead focuses on empowerment and authenticity is what’s different about community-based care.

Q: What motivates you to continue the work that you do?

A: The therapeutic relationship is an incredibly special thing. Story and storytelling were the first ways I learned to relate to the world, and often feel like my primary language. Having the privilege of sitting with someone as they define and change their narratives is a profound gift. For many of those I work with it is the first time they have been allowed the freedom to get to decide and define their role. The people I see often haven’t been given the space to slow down, get curious, and ask questions. I feel sustained in holding a door open for them to start the work of getting to know themselves.

James Pacifico (he/him)

James Pacifico, NCC, LPC Associate
Supervised By Mark Hundley, LPCS​​​​

Q: How long have you been working in the Behavioral Health Field? 

A: I’ve been in the behavioral health field for roughly one and a half years now. After six months spent seeing clients at SMU’s Center for Family Counseling during the practicum portion of my graduate program, I started working here at Resource Center where I’ve been for the past year, first as a student intern and now as an LPC Associate. I’m at an exciting point, as I’m still a relative newbie but I’ve had time to build confidence in my skills and cultivate my professional identity.

Q: What do you think is needed to help improve the mental health of LGBTQIA+ individuals?

A: For so many LGBTQIA+ individuals, their reasons for seeking mental health treatment in counseling are the same as those of anybody outside of the community. What can really make a difference for LGBTQIA+ folks, then, is having an affirming counseling space, one where they know they’ll be respected and encouraged and celebrated for their gender, sexual, and affectional identities. Another element that’s important for improved mental health is that LGBTQIA+ individuals have the confidence and the freedom to make their own decisions for their lives. It’s crucial that affirming counselors support this autonomy within the counseling space but also fight for and protect it in our society’s laws and norms.

Q: What motivates you to continue the work that you do?

A: Well, I love it! I find psychology endlessly fascinating, and I’ve come to learn that I have a gift for listening to others and fostering a calming, judgment-free space. I believe that counseling can be a significant aid to individuals who are working to improve their lives, so I find myself motivated to take advantage of my good fit with this vocation by working to become as good a counselor as I can be in order to help others, especially those in the queer community to which I belong.

 

Jose Cervantes (he/him)

TBD

Cathy Nanni (she/her)

Cathy Nanni, LPC Associate
Supervised by Scott Martin, LPC-S)

Q: How long have you been working in the Behavioral Health Field? 

A: After 20 years as a classroom teacher in public education, I decided it was time to serve my community in a different context. The most fulfilling part of teaching was helping my students see their own value, strengths, and the unique gifts they bring to the world. I wanted to take those skills and use them to support the LGBTQIA+ community. In 2021, I enrolled in SMU’s Masters in Mental Health Counseling program with a concentration in LGBTQIA+ affirmative therapy. During my master’s program, I volunteered at the Nelson Tebedo Sexual Health Clinic and completed my internship at Resource Center’s Behavioral Health. Upon graduation in December, I returned to Behavioral Health as a therapist.

Q: What do you think is needed to help improve the mental health of LGBTQIA+ individuals?

A: First and foremost, we need to continue providing inclusive and affirming spaces for LGBTQIA+ individuals to seek support. This includes ensuring that therapists are trained in LGBTQIA+ affirmative therapy and can address issues like minority stress, coming out, and gender dysphoria. We need more places like Resource Center to provide social activities and support groups to foster a sense of belonging and community.

Q: What motivates you to continue the work that you do?

A: My biggest motivator is knowing the positive impact an affirming person can have. I want people to come to my therapy room knowing that every week they have a place they can go where they are accepted, seen, and celebrated. It is a privilege to get to sit and hold space for and hear the narratives of people’s lives. Each client brings a unique story, and being part of their journey towards healing and self-discovery is both an honor and a privilege.

Abby Roberson (she/her)

TBD

Markelse Jordan (he/him)

TBD

happy thanksgiving.
All resource Center locations
closed thursday & friday,
Nov. 23 &24.